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Sunday, November 29, 2020

Cassiopeia mosaic gets larger

 


I started this imaging project at Spring season 2020m now I have shot more frames for this active region of the sky. At center of the photo lays the Bubble and cave nebula At lower left locates the Cederblad 214 and just few degrees to right from it lays the supernova remnant CTB1, it can be seen as a thin ring like formation. The Wizard nebula can be seen at upper right corner of the image. Note. there is a moon as a scale at a lower left corner of the image. This is a large area of space and I will join this mosaic image to a large one, I have shot it back in 2012. 

There is an interesting looking dim circular formation at upper left, there is a bright star at almost center of it. Could this be an uncataloged supernova remnant?

Total exposure time is now around 50 hours with my current wide field imaging system build around the Tokina AT-x 300 mm f2.8 camera optics.  Astro Don 50x50 mm square  narrowband filters, 5nm H-alpha, 3nm O-III and 3nm S-II. Camera is a massive Apogee Alta U16.


Clouds of Cassiopeia
Click for a much large image, it's worth it!

Image is in mapped colors from a light from the ionized elements, hydrogen = green, sulfur = red and oxygen = blue.


Previous version of the mosaic
Click for a large image

More info about this image here, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2020/03/from-cassiopeia-to-cepheus.html


Start of the imaging project
Click for a large image


Image info, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2020/03/from-bubble-to-cave-nebula-area.html




Monday, November 23, 2020

A new photo of Sharpless 132 (Sh2-132)

 I have shot this beautiful target in Cepheus several times with a different focal length instruments. This time I have shot it with my current setup build around Tokina AT-x 300mm f2.8   https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2020/01/the-frankenstein-monster-my-current.html


Sharpless 132 in Cepheus
Click for a large image

NOTE, An apparent size of the Moon is marked as a scale at bottom of the picture frame. This is a large object! There are very few images out of this dim and diffused supernova remnant around. Image is in mapped colours, from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulphur, G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen. 

A closeup 
Click for a large image


Older shots with a large instrument
Click for a large image


Image is shot at 2019 and it's a four panel mosaic, more info in this blog post, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2019/02/sharpless-132-sh2-132.html



Image is shot at 2014 and it's a four panel mosaic, more info in this blog post, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2014/11/a-furious-cosmic-horse-gets-blinded-by.html


Technical details


Processing workflow

Image acquisition, MaxiDL v5.07.
Stacked and calibrated in CCDStack2.
Deconvolution with a CCDStack2 Positive Constraint, 33 iterations, added at 50% weight
Color combine in PS CS3
Levels and curves in PS CS3.

Imaging optics
Tokina AT-x f2.8 camera lens

Mount
10-micron 1000

Cameras and filters
Imaging camera Apogee Alta U16 and Apogee seven slot filter wheel
Guider camera, Lodestar x 2 and an old spotting scope of Meade LX200


Astrodon filters,
5nm H-alpha 3nm S-II and 3nm O-III

Total exposure time

H-alpha, 6 x 1200 s, binned 1x1 = 2 h
O-III, 3 x 1200 s, binned 1x1 = 1 h
S-II, 3 x 1200 s, binned 2x2 = 1 h



Sunday, November 22, 2020

G65.3+5.7 , large supernova remnant in Cygnus, project continues

A large piece of an older mosaic image added, now the panorama covers sky from the Cresscent and Tulip Nebula all to wat to this large supernova remnant. 

Previous version was with six frames and it can be seen here, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2020/11/g65357-large-supernova-remnant-in.html

Here is a first single frame version of this SNR, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2020/11/a-supernova-remnant-in-cygnus-g65357-snr.html

This is a rarely imaged target, this is also one of the most difficult targets, I have ever shot. Due to a very dense star field, large angular dimension and a very diffused structure this is much more difficult target, than a Simeis 147 supernova remnant in Taurus but just little easier than an other dim SNR in a same area of sky, the Cygnus Shell, W63.  

Total exposure time of 60h was needed to have this image. The imaging system is very fast since it's undersampled and that's good when I want capture a very large, dim and diffused targets like this one. My current imaging system, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2020/01/the-frankenstein-monster-my-current.html

G65.3+5.7 SNR has a large angular dimensions, than brighter and more famous supernova remnant in Cygnus, the Veil Nebula The angular dimensions are about 3x4 degrees. This is a very difficult target, it has a very low surface brightness and the starfield is extremely dense in this part of the Milky Way.


NOTE, the "noise" in the photos is not a noise at all, it's glow from countless stars,
it can be seen best in full size photo! 


From a black hole to the supernova remnant!
Please, click for a large image, it's worth it!

NOTE, An apparent size of the Moon is marked as a scale at bottom of the picture frame. This is a large object! There are very few images out of this dim and diffused supernova remnant around. Image is in mapped colours, from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulphur, G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen. 

Next to the Tulip Nebula (A bright yellowish dot a left side of  the image) lays the micro quasar 
Cygnus X-1, a black hole candidate! 

Cygnus X-1 is marked at the image. The black hole it self can not be seen but we can see the disc of gas twirling in the balck hole. The speed of gas is so high that it turns to radiation. This star like object emits radiation in full spectrum from gamma radiation to radio frequencies and everything between.



G65.3+5.7 SNR as a single frame
Please, click for a large image, it's worth it!

What a starfield!

In visual colors
click for a large image

An ionized hydrogen emits deep red light, blue/green hues are form an ionized oxygen


Technical details

Processing workflow

Image acquisition, MaxiDL v5.07.
Stacked and calibrated in CCDStack2.
Deconvolution with a CCDStack2 Positive Constraint, 33 iterations, added at 50% weight
Color combine in PS CS3
Levels and curves in PS CS3.

Imaging optics
Tokina AT-x f2.8 camera lens

Mount
10-micron 1000

Cameras and filters
Imaging camera Apogee Alta U16 and Apogee seven slot filter wheel
Guider camera, Lodestar x 2 and an old spotting scope of Meade LX200


Astrodon filters,
5nm H-alpha 3nm S-II and 3nm O-III

Total exposure time for 12 frames

H-alpha, 24 x 1200 s, binned 1x1 = 28 h
O-III, 24 x 1200 s, binned 1x1 = 18 h
S-II, 12 x 1200 s, binned 2x2 = 14 h




Monday, November 16, 2020

G65.3+5.7 , large supernova remnant in Cygnus, project continues

Five new frames added, project will continue soon since I'm soon able to joint this new mosaic image to a much large mosaic of the area! Here is a previous single frame version of this SNR, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2020/11/a-supernova-remnant-in-cygnus-g65357-snr.html

This is a rarely imaged target, this is also one of the most difficult targets, I have ever shot. Due to a very dense star field, large angular dimension and a very diffused structure this is much more difficult target, than a Simeis 147 supernova remnant in Taurus. Total exposure time of 20h was needed to have this image. The imaging system is very fast since it's undersampled and that's good when I want capture a very large, dim and diffused targets like this one. My current imaging system, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2020/01/the-frankenstein-monster-my-current.html

G65.3+5.7 SNR has a large angular dimensions, than brighter and more famous supernova remnant in Cygnus, the Veil Nebula The angular dimensions are about 3x4 degrees. This is a very difficult target, it has a very low surface brightness and the starfield is extremely dense in this part of the Milky Way.


NOTE, the "noise" in the photos is not a noise at all, it's glow from countless stars,
it can be seen best in full size photo! 


G65.3+5.7 SNR as a six frame mosaic
Please, click for a large image, it's worth it!

NOTE, An apparent size of the Moon is marked as a scale at bottom of the picture frame. This is a large object!
There are very few images out of this dim and diffused supernova remnant around. Image is in mapped colours, from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulphur, G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen. 

An experimental starless version

An apparent size of the Moon is marked as a scale at bottom of the picture frame.


A closeup
click for a large image

This is a full resolution close up from the photo to show, how dense the star field really is!


Orientation in Cygnus
click for a large image

This super nova remnant can be seen at bottom of the image above. It's partly overlapping with my large mosaic image of Cygnus nebula complex. I have some plans to shoot more frames to the mosaic to it to fully cover both supernova remnants visible in image. 

Technical details

Processing workflow

Image acquisition, MaxiDL v5.07.
Stacked and calibrated in CCDStack2.
Deconvolution with a CCDStack2 Positive Constraint, 33 iterations, added at 50% weight
Color combine in PS CS3
Levels and curves in PS CS3.

Imaging optics
Tokina AT-x f2.8 camera lens

Mount
10-micron 1000

Cameras and filters
Imaging camera Apogee Alta U16 and Apogee seven slot filter wheel
Guider camera, Lodestar x 2 and an old spotting scope of Meade LX200


Astrodon filters,
5nm H-alpha 3nm S-II and 3nm O-III

Total exposure time

H-alpha, 24 x 1200 s, binned 1x1 = 8 h
O-III, 24 x 1200 s, binned 1x1 = 8 h
S-II, 12 x 1200 s, binned 2x2 = 4 h





Tuesday, November 3, 2020

Sharpless 124 (Sh2-124)

 I found unprocessed material from my HD! Back in January 2016 I shot data for the Sharpless object 124 in Northern Cygnus. Something must happen at the time since I never processed the data.

Sh2-124 is an emission nebula  in northern Cygnus at about 8.500 light years away.  It doesn’t seem to be imaged very often, and I was not able to find much additional information about it.


Sharpless 124
Click for a large image

Image is in mapped colors from an emission of  the ionized elements. Golden areas are from emission of sulfur and hydrogen, S-II and H-alpha, blueish areas are from ionized oxygen, O-III.


Sh2-124 in H-alpha light
Click for a large image



Technical details

Processing work flow

Image acquisition, MaxiDL v5.07.
Stacked and calibrated in CCDStack2.
Deconvolution with a CCDStack2 Positive Constraint, 33 iterations, added at 50% weight
Color combine in PS CS3
Levels and curves in PS CS3.

Imaging optics
Celestron Edge HD 1100 @ f7 with 0,7 focal reducer for Edge HD 1100 telescope

Mount
10-micron 1000

Cameras and filters
Imaging camera Apogee Alta U16 and Apogee seven slot filter wheel
Guider camera, Lodestar x2 and SXV-AOL

Astrodon filter, 5nm H-alpha
Astrodon filter, 3nm O-III
Astrodon filter, 3nm S-II

Exposure times
H-alpha, 15 x 1200s = 5h
O-III, 6 x 1200s binned 4x4 = 2h min.
S-II, 6 x 1200s  binned 4x4 = 2h min.
Total 9h


Monday, November 2, 2020

A supernova remnant G65.3+5.7 SNR in visual spectrum

 I have published this image in mapped colors yesterday. This time the color channels from narrowband channels H-alpha, O-III and S-II are combined so, that result is very close what human eye might see, if it could be sensitive enough.

G65.3+5.7 SNR in constellation Cygnus has about the same angular dimensions, than brighter and more famous remnant in Cygnus, the Veil Nebula The angular dimensions are about 3x4 degrees. This is a very difficult target it has a large angular dimensions, very low surface brightness and the starfield is extremely dense in this part of the Milky Way.

NOTE, the "noise" in the photos is not a noise at all, it's glow from countless stars,
it can be seen in full size photo!

G65.3+5.7 SNR in visual colors

Please, click for a large image, it's worth it!

Image is in Natural color palette from the emission of ionized elements, R=Hydrogen + Sulphur, G=Oxygen and B=Oxygen + 10% Hydrogen to compensate the missing H-beta emission

A closeup, lots of stars out there!
click for a large image

This is a closeup from the full resolution photo to show, how dense the star field really is!


H-alpha and O-III channels separated

O-III
click for a large image



Ha & S-II
click for a large image

A separated photos of the light from an ionized hydrogen and sulfur (H-alpha & S-II) and the light from an ionized oxygen (O-III). There is a big difference between elements. Note, the bright star just up from the center is almost invisible at O-III light. it's there but very dim at light of an ionized oxygen.


INFO

SNR G65.3+5.7 was discovered by Gull et al. (1977) during an OIII survey of the Milky Way. Some parts of this SNR were already catalogued by Stewart Sharpless in his SH2 catalog as SH2-91, SH2-94 and SH2-96, but they were not recognized as being part of a bigger structure at that time. The idea that they could be part of a larger SNR was postulated by Sidney van den Bergh in 1960, but it took until 1977 for this to be confirmed.

This is one of the larger SNR in the sky spanning a region of roughly 4.0×3.3 degrees. Mavromatakis et al. (2002) determined the age of the SNR to be 20.000-25.000 years and the distance about 2.600 – 3.200 light years. The shell has a diameter of roughly 230 lightyears! This SNR is a predominantly OIII shell with also some H-alpha signal.

Orientation in Cygnus


Technical details

Processing workflow

Image acquisition, MaxiDL v5.07.
Stacked and calibrated in CCDStack2.
Deconvolution with a CCDStack2 Positive Constraint, 33 iterations, added at 50% weight
Color combine in PS CS3
Levels and curves in PS CS3.

Imaging optics
Tokina AT-x f2.8 camera lens

Mount
10-micron 1000

Cameras and filters
Imaging camera Apogee Alta U16 and Apogee seven slot filter wheel
Guider camera, Lodestar x 2 and an old spotting scope of Meade LX200


Astrodon filters,
5nm H-alpha 3nm S-II and 3nm O-III

Total exposure time

H-alpha, 12 x 1200 s, binned 1x1 = 4 h
O-III, 12 x 1200 s, binned 1x1 = 4 h
S-II, 6 x 1200 s, binned 2x2 = 2 h






Sunday, November 1, 2020

A supernova remnant in Cygnus, G65.3+5.7 SNR

 This is a rarely imaged target, this is also one of the most difficult targets, I have ever shot. Due to a very dense star field, large angular dimension and a very diffused structure this is even more difficult target, than a Simeis 147 supernova remnant in Taurus. Total exposure time of 10h was needed to have this image. The imaging system is very fast since it's undersampled and that's good when I want capture a very large, dim and diffused targets like this one. My current imaging system, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2020/01/the-frankenstein-monster-my-current.html


G65.3+5.7 SNR has about the same angular dimensions, than brighter and more famous remnant in Cygnus, the Veil Nebula The angular dimensions are about 3x4 degrees. This is a very difficult target it has a very low surface brightness and the starfield is extremely dense in this part of the Milky Way.


NOTE, the "noise" in the photos is not a noise at all, it's glow from countless stars,
it can be seen best in full size photo!

G65.3+5.7 SNR
Please, click for a large image, it's worth it!

There are very few images out of this dim and diffused supernova remnant around. Image is in mapped colours, from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulphur, G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen. 
Note! An apparent size of the Moon in a same scale can be seen at lower left corner.


A closeup
click for a large image

This is a full resolution close up from the photo to show, how dense the star field really is!


O-III light alone
click for a large image


H-alpha and S-II light Only
click for a large image



Orientation in Cygnus
click for a large image

This super nova remnant can be seen at bottom of the image above. It's partly overlapping with my large mosaic image of Cygnus nebula complex. I have some plans to shoot more frames to the mosaic to it to fully cover both supernova remnants visible in image. 

Technical details

Processing workflow

Image acquisition, MaxiDL v5.07.
Stacked and calibrated in CCDStack2.
Deconvolution with a CCDStack2 Positive Constraint, 33 iterations, added at 50% weight
Color combine in PS CS3
Levels and curves in PS CS3.

Imaging optics
Tokina AT-x f2.8 camera lens

Mount
10-micron 1000

Cameras and filters
Imaging camera Apogee Alta U16 and Apogee seven slot filter wheel
Guider camera, Lodestar x 2 and an old spotting scope of Meade LX200


Astrodon filters,
5nm H-alpha 3nm S-II and 3nm O-III

Total exposure time

H-alpha, 12 x 1200 s, binned 1x1 = 4 h
O-III, 12 x 1200 s, binned 1x1 = 4 h
S-II, 6 x 1200 s, binned 2x2 = 2 h






Sunday, October 25, 2020

Exhibition, Oulu, Finland 28.10 - 15.11. 2020

 EXHIBITION



KUTSU SINULLE JA YSTÄVILLESI
            
     

J-P METSÄVAINIO
PER ASPERA AD ASTRA
28.10.-15.11.2020
 
J-P Metsävainio kuvaa yöllisen taivaan kauneutta tieteen työmenetelmiä ja välineitä hyödyntäen. Per aspera ad astra -näyttely esittelee hänen uusimpia astronomisia luontokuviaan. Vaikka itse kuvausprosessi on teknisesti raskas, Metsävainion valokuvat soivat sfäärien musiikkia luonnollisesti ja tekniikan kahleista vapautuneena. Katsojalle avautuu yhä uusia näkymiä ympäröivään todellisuuteen taiteilijan raottaessa salaisuuksien verhoa ympärillämme. 

Järjestämme näyttelyn aikana taiteilijatapaamisia ryhmille ja työporukoille. Jos olet kiinnostunut tapaamaan taiteilija näyttelyn aikana, niin soita galleristi Hanna Manniselle 040 1780 980 järjestääksesi taiteilijatapaamisen.

Juhlimme näyttelyn avajaisia tiistaina 27.10.2020 klo 18-20!  Taiteilija on paikalla avajaisissa. Tervetuloa!

 
Lisätietoja näyttelystä ja teoskuvia: https://mabd.fi/nayttely/j-p-metsavainio/

Friday, October 9, 2020

New photo, Sharpless 126 in lacerta

 


I haven't seen many pictures about this large and diffused nebula before. 
This is a very good target for my photon hungry wider field setup, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2020/01/the-frankenstein-monster-my-current.html

'

Sharpless 126, Sh2-126
Click for a large image

A bicolor image from the light from ionized elements hydrogen (H-alpha) and oxygen (O-III)


INFO

Sharpless 126 (Sh2-126) is a large emission nebula in Lacerta. The source of its ionization is the ultraviolet radiation from the star 10 Lacertae.

This region with its weak nebulous filaments is part of a huge star forming region, 1200 light years away from earth.

H-alpha alone
Click for a large image



Technical details

Processing workflow

Image acquisition, MaxiDL v5.07.
Stacked and calibrated in CCDStack2.
Deconvolution with a CCDStack2 Positive Constraint, 33 iterations, added at 50% weight
Color combine in PS CS3
Levels and curves in PS CS3.

Imaging optics
Tokina 300 mm AT-x f2.8 camera lens

Mount
10-micron 1000

Cameras and filters
Imaging camera Apogee Alta U16 and Apogee seven slot filter wheel
Guider camera, Lodestar x 2 and an old spotting scope of Meade LX200


Astrodon filters,
5nm H-alpha 3nm S-II and 3nm O-III

Total exposure time

H-alpha, 9 x 1200 s, binned 1x1 = 3 h
O-III, 1 x 1200 s, binned 1x1= 20 min.

Wednesday, October 7, 2020

The Tulip nebula area in cygnus, Sh2-101, in natural colors

 


In my previous blog post this image can be seen in mapped colors, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2020/10/the-tulip-nebula-in-cygnus-sh2-101.html

Photo is taken with my temporary imaging system, at the moment I'm out of the actual telescope : (
Mor info about this tool set can be seen here, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2020/01/the-frankenstein-monster-my-current.html

The tulip Nebula area 
Please, click for a large image, it's worth it!¨

Image is in Natural color palette from the emission of ionized elements, R=Hydrogen + Sulphur, G=Oxygen and B=Oxygen + 10% Hydrogen to compensate the missing H-beta emission


An experimental starless view
click for a large image


Info

I have shot the actual Tulip Nebula with a large 11" telescope, images and info about the Tulip nebula can be seen HERE. An other interesting detail, a blue crescent like shape at center left. It's a Wolf Rayet shell around a star WR 134. I have shot this also with a large telescope, more info and images can be found HERE  

A closeup photo of the Wolf Rayet Shell around the star WR 134

This feature can be found from the new wide field photo at center left.



Nebula in light of an ionized hydrogen alone (H-alpha)
click for a large image

Nine twenty minute 5 nm H-alpha exposures are calibrated with bias corrected flats and stacked to this cumulative three hour exposure. 


Technical details

Processing workflow

Image acquisition, MaxiDL v5.07.
Stacked and calibrated in CCDStack2.
Deconvolution with a CCDStack2 Positive Constraint, 33 iterations, added at 50% weight
Color combine in PS CS3
Levels and curves in PS CS3.

Imaging optics
Tokina AT-x f2.8 camera lens

Mount
10-micron 1000

Cameras and filters
Imaging camera Apogee Alta U16 and Apogee seven slot filter wheel
Guider camera, Lodestar x 2 and an old spotting scope of Meade LX200


Astrodon filters,
5nm H-alpha 3nm S-II and 3nm O-III

Total exposure time

H-alpha, 9 x 1200 s, binned 1x1 = 3 h
O-III, from my older photo of the area
S-II, from my older photo of the area
Older photo can be seen here, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2011/12/cygnus-mosaic-18-panels-and-22-x-14.html

Tuesday, October 6, 2020

The Tulip nebula in cygnus, Sh2-101

 


This is my second light photo for the cloudy Autumn season 2020. The area next to well known Tulip Nebula is very beautiful and less imaged  due to its large size and relatively low surface brightness. My current toolset is very suitable for this kind of objects, since its kind of heavily undersampled and that's good when I need to capture very dim and large objects.


The tulip Nebula area 
Please, click for a large image, it's worth it!

Image is in mapped colours, from the emission of ionized elements, R=Sulphur, G=Hydrogen and B=Oxygen. 


A starless view
click for a large image

An experimental starless version shows the actual nebula complex better.

Info

I have shot the actual Tulip Nebula with a large 11" telescope, images and info about the Tulip nebula can be seen HERE. An other interesting detail, a blue crescent like shape at center left. It's a Wolf Rayet shell around a star WR 134. I have shot this also with a large telescope, more info and images can be found HERE  

A closeup photo of the Wolf Rayet Shell around the star WR 134

This feature can be found from the new wide field photo at center left.

Nebula in light of an ionized hydrogen alone (H-alpha)
click for a large image

Nine twenty minute 5 nm H-alpha exposures are calibrated with bias corrected flats and stacked to this cumulative three hour exposure. 

Technical details

Processing workflow

Image acquisition, MaxiDL v5.07.
Stacked and calibrated in CCDStack2.
Deconvolution with a CCDStack2 Positive Constraint, 33 iterations, added at 50% weight
Color combine in PS CS3
Levels and curves in PS CS3.

Imaging optics
Tokina AT-x f2.8 camera lens

Mount
10-micron 1000

Cameras and filters
Imaging camera Apogee Alta U16 and Apogee seven slot filter wheel
Guider camera, Lodestar x 2 and an old spotting scope of Meade LX200


Astrodon filters,
5nm H-alpha 3nm S-II and 3nm O-III

Total exposure time

H-alpha, 9 x 1200 s, binned 1x1 = 3 h
O-III, from my older photo of the area
S-II, from my older photo of the area
Older photo can be seen here, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2011/12/cygnus-mosaic-18-panels-and-22-x-14.html



Sunday, September 27, 2020

First light for the Autumn season 2020

 


First light for the season is always a big thing for me personally. I have had really bad troubles to have a imaging telescope. Lots of promises but nothing  happens so i'm out of real tools. I do have a kind of working imaging platform built around an old Tokina AT-x 300mm f2.8 camera lens, here is some info about this toolset, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/2020/01/the-frankenstein-monster-my-current.html

I have an imaging plan but for the first light I selected something more "easy" to test my system after a six months pause due to nightless nights up here near to polar circle. A supernova remnant Veil Nebula in constellation cygnus is a beautiful and large target with some really dim parts and background nebulae.
I have shot the Veil nebula many times during the years with a different optical configurations and it's always shows something new and different, what a fascinating target!


Veil Nebula
Please, click for a large image, it's worth it

Image is in natural colors combined from the narrowband channels. H-alpha = Red, O-III = Green and O-III + 20% H-alpha = Blue.



A closeup
click for a large image

A full resolution closeup, the camera lens draws beautifully when well collimated and focused.
lots of stars there, star colors are combined from narrowband channels H-alpha and O-III.


An experimental starless image
click for a large image

The starless version of Veil Nebula makes easier to see very faint details in nebulae otherwise buried under the dense starfield of the Milky Way. 



Veil nebula in a light from an ionized hydrogen, H-alpha
click for a large image


INFO

Veil Nebula locates in a constellation Cygnus at distance of about 2400 ly. It's a cloud of ionized gas and dust, leftovers from an exploded star. The star went off some 5000-8000 years ago at distance of about 1470 light years. This, relatively faint target, is difficult to image due to the large angular diameter, about three degrees, and a dense star field. I have shot this target so many times over the years and i never get tired to it, ther is always something new to find in it, Here is a collection my photos from this fascinating target, https://astroanarchy.blogspot.com/search?q=Veil+nebula
Just click "Next  Post" at end of the page to see more!


Technical details
Processing workflow
Image acquisition, MaxiDL v5.07.
Stacked and calibrated in CCDStack2.
Deconvolution with a CCDStack2 Positive Constraint, 33 iterations, added at 50% weight
Color combine in PS CS3
Levels and curves in PS CS3.

Imaging optics
Tokina AT-x 300mm f2.8 camera lens

Mount
10-micron 1000

Cameras, filters and guiding
Imaging camera Apogee Alta U16 and Apogee seven slot filter wheel
Guider camera, Lodestar x 2 and an old spotting scope of Meade LX200
Astrodon filters,
5nm H-alpha 3nm S-II and 3nm O-III

Total exposure time
H-alpha, 12 x 1200 s, binned 1x1 = 4 h
O-III, 6 x 1200 s, binned 1x1 = 2 h
S-II, 3 x 1200s, binned 1x1 = 1h


Friday, September 25, 2020

Cosmic Clouds 3D is published now!


Cosmic Clouds 3D
Where Stars Are Born

At September 23. we had a live broadcast with Brian May, David J Eicher and me.
It was hosted by Alison Boyle from the Science Museum of London, many thanks!


From top left, Science Museum Keeper of Science Collections Alison Boyle, Artist and astrophotographer J-P Metsavainio, Astronomy Magazine editor David J. Eicher and the legendary Queen guitarist and astrophysicist Brian May.

You can see a recording from the live broadcast from here,

You can buy the book from the London Stereoscopic company,
https://shop.londonstereo.com/cosmic-clouds-3-d.html







 

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

A press relase, lehdistötiedote

 

Cosmic Clouds 3D
Where stars are born

A press release About the book  is out

You can download it from HERE (In English)

Lehdistötiedote kirjasta on julkaistu.

Voit ladata sen TÄÄLTÄ (suomeksi)


A book by Brian May, David J Eicher and J-P Metsavainio







Monday, September 14, 2020

Astronomical Nature photographs, exhibition in Helsinki, Finland

 




Exhibition in Helsinki

Gallery A2, Annankatu 12 Helsinki, welcome!

Exhibition will end at September 20. 2020

https://www.galleria-a2.fi/














astro Anarchy get published

 


Book project finalized!
Cosmic Clouds 3D

By
Brian May (Yes, the legendary Queen guitarist and astrophysicist)
David J Eicher
and
J-P Metsavainio

This unique Book shows the cosmic wonders in 3D


More info about this book, please visit in official site of QUEEN
http://www.queenonline.com/news/pre-order-cosmic-clouds-3-d-by-brian-may